Seattle To Shanghai And Back Again

We did it! After a little bit more than a year back in the United States, we culled through the combined posts from this blog and my wife’s blog, as well as a few thousand photographs, and have published a book documenting our time living in Shanghai. It is available from Blurb as both an eBook for the iPad, or as a 6″ x 9″ softcover book.

Seattle To Shanghai, And Back Again
Seattle To Sha…
Our Year As Expats
By Melinda L. Hoyt, T…
Photo book

Day 317: Waiting for Shanghai

Freighters anchor in Elliott Bay waiting for an end to a dock workers' slowdown.

Freighters anchor in Elliott Bay waiting for an end to a dock workers’ slowdown.

And still we wait. Our possessions were shipped from Shanghai back in early October, but a slowdown by dock workers here in the USA has caused a backlog of freight that remains on the docks, or on ship that have yet to be unloaded. We are scheduled to move out of temporary housing and into our new apartment on December 1st, but may have to extend our temporary stay while we wait for pots and pans and towels and lamps and furniture.

Day 248: Coffee to Go

A portable coffee vendor in Ho Chi Minh City

A portable coffee vendor in Ho Chi Minh City

The small, gasoline powered scooter is the heartbeat of Ho Chi Minh City, pulsing down the streets by the millions, surging, slowing, swerving and stopping. Everyone it seems has a scooter and they use them for everything: to transport families of five, to nap upon, to lounge on with a newspaper and a smoke, to transport large loads and newborn babies. And to earn a living.

Day 237: Compensation

Bicyclist blocks path of taxi after minor accident; she is waiting for compensation

Bicyclist blocks path of taxi after minor accident; she is waiting for compensation

Compensation on the spot is a Chinese tradition that applies to a myriad of circumstances, none more common than a traffic accident. Just this morning I read a post where a taxi driver hit a scooter, knocking the rider to the ground and injuring his leg. A crowd quickly surrounded the scene. The taxi driver thrust 200 RMB (about $32 USD) at the injured rider and attempted to flee the scene, but the crowd refused to allow him to leave, arguing that the compensation wasn’t sufficient to pay for a hospital examination and an x-ray. During the argument the scooter driver took the 200 RMB and rode off.